Festive Fireworks set to affect 75% of families this Christmas

Pass the Bomb this Christmas, but don’t let it blow into a festive family feud

 

A nationwide survey has revealed that three quarters of people in Britain who play family games at Christmas end up falling out. Gibsons - the UK’s oldest puzzle and games company conducted the study to find out how to avoid a family feud this Christmas.

 

The study asked family members to confirm what factors had caused their festive feuds when it came to games. Coming in at the top of the naughty list is cheating (36%) followed closely by competitive teammates (33%) and people making up the rules (29%). The study also exposed that surprisingly more women (76%) fall out over games than men (73%).

 

Cheating causes almost half (45%) of all fall-outs in the 18-24 age bracket, compared to adults aged 55+ who are more likely to be too full to concentrate on family games and lose track of what’s happening. The survey also found that people who live in the same household are more likely to argue with each other than those who are visiting.

 

Dr. Amanda Gummer, the UK’s leading expert on play and play development, commented on the survey “Playing family games is an extremely positive activity for bonding with family members and close friends, despite the occasional disagreement. Word games, such as Gibsons Pass the Bomb, keep our brains intellectually engaged over the Christmas holidays and can help develop cognitive skills through interactive family fun. 

 

“To help avoid any fall-outs when playing games, families can follow a few easy steps. Make sure that everyone is aware of the rules and the consequences of cheating before starting to play, lead by example and try to create a fun, not too competitive atmosphere.”

 

National statistics

 

  • The biggest cheaters can be found in Northern Ireland – 46% experienced a fall-out over cheating
  • The most honest games players are in Wales – only a quarter of game players have fallen out over cheating

 

To help reduce the amount of festive fireworks this Christmas Gibsons has created a Gibsons’ ‘Play Nicely’ free hotline dedicated to helping settle any disagreements before they cause a family blow-out. The hotline will be open on Christmas Day and Boxing Day from 12pm-9pm and can be reached on 0800 012 9010.

 

Managing Director – Nick Wright commented:Playing family games is a fundamental part of British Christmas and has been since Gibsons launched in 1919. Games are designed to be fun, and we want to keep it that way which is why we have opened the Gibsons’ Play Nicely hotline to make sure that families are spending less time bickering over the rules and more time playing.

 

“To make sure that we don’t discriminate against any game players the hotline is open to all games. Our Christmas specialist is an expert in all games!”

 

Gibsons has been entertaining generations since 1919, with a number of top games and puzzles including the family friendly word game Pass the Bomb. 

 

-ENDS-

 

For more information, logos, images or interviews please contact Alana Caldwell at gibsons@sensecommuniactions.co.uk or call 0203 551 3954.

 

 

Note to editors:

 

About Gibsons

 

  • Founded in 1919 as H. P. Gibson & Sons Limited.

 

  • In the late 70s H P Gibson & Sons shortened its name to ‘Gibsons’, and shortly after, in the early 80s, Gibsons introduced their first jigsaw puzzles.

 

  • Along with the new jigsaws came new themes, replacing dreary subject matters with delectable new imagery, often drawn by specially commissioned artists. 

 

  • Gibsons originally had only six puzzle pictures in the range which depicted aerial shots of well-known British landmarks, but nowadays, the range has grown to over 250 titles, running from 2 to 2000 pieces, with over 50 new jigsaw puzzle images added every year. 

 

  • Gibsons have a broad selection of products for all the family including games and puzzles suitable from pre-school to big school and beyond! http://gibsonsgames.co.uk

 

  • The business is still owned and run by the Gibsons family. 
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